The right to be forgotten vs backup, the growing impact of data science in security, how to teach AI to forget, and a great sample out of a series of 50 Articles celebrating the Moon-Landing

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GDPR and backup: What have we learned in one year? (SearchDataBackup)

A question that is often raised by customers: ‘There are two issues at play with an EU citizen’s ability to ask an organization to remove any record of data. The first is the question of “Does a deletion request include removing data from backups?”. The second issue around GDPR and backup is that, should an organization delete a record and then recover from an older backup (containing the now-deleted record), the deleted record will be reanimated and put back into production, making the organization noncompliant.’ Nick Cavalancia investigates some of the latest available guidances, via TechTarget.com

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Perfect storm for data science in security (ComputerWeekly.com)

Applied correctly, data science is helping to improve cyber security capabilities both pre- and post-breach: “In the pre-breach context, data science is making a huge contribution in enabling organisations to identify malicious code by using supervised machine learning technology to extract behavioural features from suspicious executables run in isolated environments. Post-breach, anomaly detection is among the most successful applications of data science. Once attackers are inside the enterprise, they look like users. They are using valid credentials to access systems and data, and they are stealing that data using built in system tools, making it difficult to detect.” An interview with Joshua Neil, principal data scientist lead for ATP at Microsoft, by Warwick Ashford for CompterWeekly.com

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The Next Big Privacy Hurdle? Teaching AI to Forget (WIRED)

‘While AI systems may have the memory of an elephant, they are not infallible… This discovery means that the inability to forget doesn’t only impact personal privacy—it could also lead to real problems for our global security.’ Darren Shou via wired.com

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How NASA gave birth to modern computing—and gets no credit for it (Fast Company)

Recommended for fans of history, technology and space-travel: ’50 Days to the Moon’. Here by example the 13th in an series of 50 articles, one published each day until July 20, exploring the 50th anniversary of the first-ever Moon landing. An article by Charles Fishman via wired.com

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