Digital Infrastructure in Sports, Understanding Encryption, Ransomware targeting industrial environments, and an impressive long-read about Influence as-a-service

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Technology in sport: Inside the stadium of the future | ZDNet (ZDNet)

An interesting spotlight on the digital infrastructure that is put in place in and around sport-venues in order to provide new types of customer experiences at the ground. This means no less than 1,600 Wi-Fi Access Points and 700 Bluetooth beacons for example. “Technology is key to design-thinking for the stadium, whether that’s for access systems, cashless technologies, Wi-Fi coverage, or incorporating the signal of all four of the major UK mobile providers,” he says. “Ultimately it’s about producing an infrastructure and a backbone that allows us to embrace new technologies as they come out. We want to be able to constantly incorporate those within the stadium.”

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Encryption: A cheat sheet (TechRepublic)

‘Professionals are concerned about digital data—confidential emails, budget spreadsheets, private messages, bank records, and a multitude of other types of sensitive information that is stored or transmitted online. The data is protected with encryption. Knowing that encryption exists and understanding what it is are two different things, and the answer can be complicated. Having a basic knowledge of encryption is important for professionals who deal with private data, even if you don’t deal with the particulars yourself.’ A crisp and clear overview by Brandon Vigliarolo for techrepublic.com

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A Guide to LockerGoga, the Ransomware Crippling Industrial Firms (WIRED)

Andy Greenberg gives a detailed view on how this particular wave of Ransomware is causing Industrial-Level Pain. ‘LockerGoga’s victims aren’t limited to industrial or manufacturing victims. Instead, the vicitims include “targets of opportunity” in other business sectors too—any company that hackers believe will pay and for which they can gain an initial foothold. But the unusual number of crippled industrial firms LockerGoga has left in its wake, combined with its hyperaggressive effects, represent an especially serious risk, according to Dragos’ Joe Slowik.

Slowik warns that the more recent, disruptive form of the malware could easily infect the computers those firms use to control industrial equipment—the so-called “human-machine interface” or HMI machines that run software sold by companies like Siemens and GE for remotely managing automated physical processes. In the worst-case scenario, the ransomware might paralyze those computers and lead to unsafe conditions or even industrial accidents.’ Via wired.com

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The Follower Factory (New York Times)

A great piece re. Influence as-a-service: ‘These accounts are counterfeit coins in the booming economy of online influence, reaching into virtually any industry where a mass audience — or the illusion of it — can be monetized. Fake accounts, deployed by governments, criminals and entrepreneurs, now infest social media networks. By some calculations, as many as 48 million of Twitter’s reported active users — nearly 15 percent — are automated accounts designed to simulate real people, though the company claims that number is far lower.’ By Nicholas Confessore, Gabriel J.X. Dance, Richard Harris and Mark Hansen for nytimes.com

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