Taking a look forward with Gartner, a surprising number shows how amazingly efficient the human brain is, thoughts on proving ones digital identity, and a game of Robot Dog vs. Illinois Privacy Law

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10 ways data and analytics will impact businesses (TechRepublic)

‘Data and analytics leaders must examine the potential business impact of these technology trends, and adjust business models accordingly—or risk losing competitive advantage to companies that do’ as per Rita Sallam, research vice president at Gartner. “The story of data and analytics keeps evolving, from supporting internal decision making to continuous intelligence, information products and appointing chief data officers. It’s critical to gain a deeper understanding of the technology trends fueling that evolving story and prioritize them based on business value.” Via TechRepublic.

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Your Brain Needs 1.5 MB of Storage to Master Your Native Language

 

Your Brain Needs 1.5 MB of Storage to Master Your Native Language (Live Science)

To be honest, I would guessed a much higher number…. ‘a new study suggests that an average English-speaking adult will have learned about 12.5 million bits of information related to language. It may seem surprising but, in terms of digital media storage, our knowledge of language almost fits on a floppy disk,” the authors wrote in the study. In this case, that would be a floppy disk that holds about 1.5 megabytes of information, or the equivalent of about a minute-long song as an Mp3 file.’ Yasemin Saplakoglu via Live Science.

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Rebuilding trust in democracy starts with digital identity verification (Podium | The Next Web)

Food for though, linking the ability to prove and guarantee ones digital identity to the future of a working (digital and non-digital) society: ‘Identity verification. It’s not a word that people use on a day-to-day basis, but who you believe you are is the core of being human. Being able to prove your identity is an essential need that humans have to engage in the world. Think about that whenever you apply for a credit card, a loan, a mortgage, or even when you open a new account online. When there is an inability to prove who you are, it creates a ripple effect, leaving a wake of disinformation and distrust. Take Facebook and Marriott for example. Millions of people have lost the privacy of their personal data. It is now also relatively easy for this identity data to be misappropriated and misused.’ An thought-provoking piece by Vinny Lingham via TNW Podium.

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Aibo’s dark side: Why Illinois bans Sony’s robot dog (CNET)

Because of its’ face-detecting capabilities, Sony isn’t allowed to sell Aibo the Robot Dog in Illinois. The state’s Biometric Information Privacy Act (BIPA) regulates the collection of biometric data, including face scans. As a result, Illinois also limits access to facial recognition in home security cameras, a feature that’s becoming increasingly prevalent in the consumer security market.’ Part of the learning what is right, and what might be technically possible, but still wrong. A piece by Megan Wollerton via CNET.

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