Microsoft launches a whole set of online courses to help business leaders define an AI strategy for their company, a long-read dives into how to tackle the 21st century workplace challenge, and a second long-read reflects on lessons learned from Y2K (or not).

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Microsoft’s new AI Business School teaches execs how to lead AI initiatives, for free

‘As companies grapple with how to implement artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning tools to improve decision making and gain a competitive advantage, executives and business leaders are often stalled by questions about how and where to begin adding in these technologies across the company, what cultural changes will be required, and how to build AI systems in ways that are responsible, protect privacy and security, and comply with regulations. In response, Microsoft launched a free, online AI Business School to help business leaders navigate creating an AI strategy.’ Alison DeNisco Rayome summarizes this very useful initiative for www.techrepublic.com

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The First Signs Of A Global Human Management Revolution | Corporate Rebels

a longer read from corporate-rebels.com, a team that always adds a different perspective and real-live examples of companies that are at the forefront of tackling the 21st century workplace challenge. Questions that are tackled here include: What happened after Peter Drucker dropped his productivity challenge in 1991? What happened to the annual productivity rate since then? What happened to the inequality between employees and bosses in recent decades? And what happened to the disengagement levels of the workforce in general?

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Are we Finally Learning the Lesson of Y2K ?

A long read that draws a straight line from Y2K to today, and lessons learned – or not – from that: ‘In the last two decades, we have continued unabated in building ever more complex computer systems. We’ve linked them together across a network that dwarfs, in complexity and scope, that which existed in 1999. Along the way, we’ve deepened our faith in the ability of computers to make our world a better place, but obscured our understanding of how they work or the unexpected consequences they might create. Y2K should have made us question our faith in the machines. It may have had exactly the opposite effect. We rely on computers, and their coding, for so much — to show our children the world and inform us about what goes on in it; to help decide who loses money and who makes it, or who goes to jail and who doesn’t; to drive our cars and heat our homes; to help us find jobs; to help our doctors find out what’s wrong with us.’ By Colin Horgan, via Medium.

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